SS Deutschland

The SS Deutschland of Hamburg America launched in 1900, a ship of similar size, proportions, and looks of the NGL Kaiser Class of ships. Although appearing similar to the SS Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, the Deutschland was a much different ship. The engine design and ship layout were not as conducive to luxury travel. Although the ship was fast, and did capture the Blue Riband several times, the vibrations caused by the engines caused the ship to run at reduced speeds. At this point, Hamburg America decided the next round of ship would be larger and more luxurious at the expense of speed. These new successors would ultimately be finished in time for WWI, but not utilized in the war effort and being surrendered to Allied forces as reparations stipulated in the Paris Peace Treaty ending the war.

Sidelined during the war with engine problems, the ship ultimately became a cruise ship, then an immigrant transport sailing until the mid 1920's when retired from service and sold for scrap.

SS Deutschland steamship ocean liner docked in port
SS Deutschland steamship ocean liner cruising

Cruising as SS Viktoria Louise

Capturing the Blue Riband several times throughout her career, the Deutschland a powerful and fast ship. As speed and power were sought by HAPAG, the ship suffered from great amounts of vibration and unpleasantness from the oversized engines.

These persistent engine problems and rising competition from other larger and faster ships, the SS Deutschland changed service to cruising. as the SS Viktoria Louise

SS Deutschland During WWI

As WWI broke out, she was converted to an auxiliary cruiser, but her persistent engine troubles sidelined her for most of the conflict. Fortunately, the engine issues and unsustainable coal consumption sidelined the ship, and ultimately saved it from destruction in WWI. 

SS Deutschland steamship ocean liner cruising out of port
SS Hansa entering port, former SS Deutschland
SS Hansa after WWI

Shortly after surviving WWI, in 1921, the ship underwent a major overhaul to turn from a cruise ship to an immigrant transport as the SS Hansa. Part of the overhaul was removing the front two funnels and stripping the opulent first class interior.

After 1925, when the US limited the amount of immigration into the country, the ship was retired and ultimately sold for scrap.

SS Deutschland Ship Facts

 
Length:
Tonnage:
Beam:
Draft:
Number of Decks:
16,703 GRT
679' - 9"
67' - 4"
27' - 11"
6
Cruising Speed:
17.5 Knots (20.1 mph or 32.4 km/hr)
Max Speed:
23.15 Knots (26.6mph or 42.8km/h)
Line:
Shipyard:
AG Vulcan, Stettin Germany
Port of Registry:
Hamburg
Maiden Voyage:
July 6, 1900
Years in Service:
1900-1925
Current Status:
Scrapped in 1925
SS Deutschland
SS Hansa

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